The Army and Economic Mobilization

By R. Elberton Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
General Policies in
Contract Placement and Clearance

Selection of Contractors

Army Selection Policies

Use of Allocated Facilities --The selection of Army contractors at the beginning of the emergency in 1940 was basically oriented by the facility allocation plans prepared during the interwar period. This was especially true for the Ordnance Department but applied in varying degree to the Air Corps and the other supply arms and services. The Quartermaster Corps and the Medical Department, whose procurement responsibility involved a large proportion of commercial-type items, were able to rely heavily upon public advertising to elicit current sources of supply when the emergency came. Yet even for these procuring arms the selection of contractors for most items was guided if not determined by the facility surveys and allocation plans of the previous decade.1

No comprehensive statistics are available to indicate precisely the extent to which contract placement in the defense period conformed to the facility allocation plans and accepted schedules of production of the preceding period. Nevertheless, the dominant influence of the prewar plans is evident both from such sample figures as are available and from statements by participants in the procurement program during the defense and war years:

In placing our orders with industry, we are following the "allocation system" whenever possible and practicable. The "education order" programs of 1939 and 1940 and the "production study" program of 1940 have been of great assistance. The net results of these programs will be a saving of funds from the 1940 appropriations, and, more important, a reduced time of delivery for a great many items.2

When the burden of the present defense program was placed on the Department, the supply services immediately started operating under the industrial mobilization plan. They promptly placed orders for munitions with plants previously allocated, using informal competition whenever possible.3

____________________
1
"As it actually turned out, the low bidders were in most cases the plants that had in the past been allocated to do the job . . . . they had the courage to bid the lowest. There were millions of dollars in these first war orders and many manufacturers were afraid of the huge quantities involved. But the allocated plants were the ones that knew what was wanted and how to deal with the services courageously." Col Ray M. Hare, Survey and Allocation of Facilities, 29 Jan 46, ICAF Lecture (L46-16).
2
Maj Gen Charles M. Wesson, CofOrd, The Current Procurement Situation in the Ordnance Department, 2 Oct 40, AIC Lectures, 17:345 1/2.
3
Testimony of USW Patterson, 15 Apr 41, Truman Committee, Hearings, 1:30. Mr. Patterson's prepared statements cited in this and the following footnote contains a wealth of factual information on the launching of the War Department's emergency procurement program.

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Army and Economic Mobilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 749

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.