The Army and Economic Mobilization

By R. Elberton Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIII Priorities: Problems Application and Operation

The Critical List and Preference-Rating Extensions

Perhaps the most controversial feature of the priorities system from its inception in the summer of 1940 until well after Pearl Harbor was the role of the so-called Critical List. This feature exerted a profound influence upon the development of the priorities system. It created considerable friction between the armed services and the early priority-control agencies, and was an important factor in the later insistence of the services upon the adoption of a vertical system of material controls. A consideration of the various issues surrounding the development and application of the Critical List goes to the heart of the problem of organizing production controls in a complex industrial economy.1

The exact origin of the Critical List is shrouded in considerable mystery. In order to trace its beginnings it is necessary to go back to the eight-week period between 17 June 1940--when the ANMB Priorities Committee was appointed and 12 August when the new priorities system was announced. Under its 17 June mandate from the Assistant Secretaries, the Priorities Committee had proceeded on the assumption that the purpose of a priorties system was to insure, so far as possible, the production and delivery of procurement items in order of their strategic importance or urgency. This meant that an item assigned a given priority rating must have a superior claim, as against lower rated items, upon a manufacturer's facilities and upon all contributory materials or services from whatever source needed by the manufacturer and his suppliers to produce the completed item. All this had been contemplated by priority proposals under industrial mobilization planning in the interwar period.

Accordingly, the committee's first draft of the proposed new system ( 10 July 1940) provided that priority ratings assigned to prime contracts could be automatically "extended" to successive subcontracts or orders all down the contractual chain, thus requiring preferred treatment of all items contributory to the prime contract: "This priority rating, if necessary, may be automatically extended to materials, services, machine tools, related, production machinery, equipment, and supplies essential to production and the scheduled completion of these contracts."2 To implement this purpose the

____________________
1
See above, pages 510-11, for earlier discussion of the Critical List.
2
Draft of Ltr, Johnson, ASW, and Lewis Compton, ASN, To All Supply Arms and Services of the Army and Bureaus of the Navy, 10 Jul 40 sub: Priorities, with 3 incls: (1) Draft Rules and Regulations, Priorities Committee, ANMB, 10 Jul 40

-528-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Army and Economic Mobilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 749

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.