Rethinking the Korean War: A New Diplomatic and Strategic History

By William Stueck | Go to book overview
FIG. 3. The primary negotiators of the agreement on
Korea in Moscow, December 1945.
29
FIG. 4. Opening session of meetings between the Soviet and American
occupation commands in Korea at Seoul in January 1946.
29
FIG. 5. A banner at Seoul's South Gate welcomes members of the UN
Temporary Commission on Korea in early 1948.
43
FIG. 6. South Koreans wait in line to cast ballots in UN
supervised election of May 10, 1948.
43
FIG. 7. South Koreans celebrate independence and the inauguration of the
government of the Republic of Korea, Seoul, August 15, 1948.
44
FIG. 8. The first U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Korea,
John J. Muccio, signs over the government in South Korea to
the ROK on September 12, 1948.
44
FIG. 9. The United Nations Security Council discusses the Korean
issue on June 30, 1950, as U.S. troops were being rushed from
Japan to Korea. Courtesy of Getty Images
64
FIG. 10. Ceremony of September 29, 1950, restoring the ROK
government in Seoul.
91
FIG. 11. UN forces found the capital building heavily camouflaged
when they captured Pyongyang, the North Korean capital, during
the third week of October 1950.
91
FIG. 12. Chinese troops captured by the First U.S. Marine Division in
North Korea on December 9, 1950.
121
FIG. 13. A Turkish unit rests on a mountain road in western Korea. 121
FIG. 14. General Matthew B. Ridgway, commander of the Eighth Army in
Korea, honors a French unit for its heroic stand against the Chinese at
Chipyong-ni in February 1950.
122
FIG. 15. UN motorcade halted at Kaesong checkpoint, July 1951. 148
FIG. 16. UN delegates to the Armistice Conference at the main entrance of
the conference house, July 16, 1951.
148
FIG. 17. Tents and huts at the second conference site,
Panmunjom, March 1952.
156

-x-

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