Opening NATO's Door: How the Alliance Remade Itself for a New Era

By Ronald D. Asmus | Go to book overview

Book VII
HEAD-TO-HEAD AT MADRID

The ink was barely dry on the NATO-Russia Founding Act when the Clinton Administration faced its next fight—this time with some of our closest allies. The issue was which Central and East European candidate countries would receive invitations to join NATO at the Madrid summit. Related, and equally contentious, was how firm a commitment the Alliance would make to continue the enlargement process in the future. The Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland were the leading candidates to receive invitations. Slovenia and Romania were, for different reasons, longer shots but each had launched its own aggressive lobbying effort to make the Alliance's short list. Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar's strong-arm authoritarian tactics had taken Slovakia out of the running. 1 No one in NATO was seriously pushing to include the Baltic states for the first round of enlargement, but disagreements over how to address their future prospects added to the mix of issues dividing the allies.

Having led the Alliance enlargement debate for nearly three years, the United States now found itself outflanked by France, Italy, and other allies who argued that a larger round of enlargement including Romania and Slovenia would provide better geopolitical balance and help stabilize southeastern Europe. Washington opposed this larger group on the grounds that they were not yet qualified, that their inclusion would damage the prospects for further enlargement down the road, especially to the Baltic states, and that a larger group could

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Opening NATO's Door: How the Alliance Remade Itself for a New Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Opening NATO's Door - How the Alliance Remade Itself for a New Era *
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Note on Sources xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Opening Nato's Door xxxiii
  • Book I - The Origins 1
  • Book II - The Debate Begins 18
  • Book III - Across the Rubicon 58
  • Book IV - Establishing the Dual Track 99
  • Book V - Toward a New NATO 134
  • Book VI - The Nato-Russia Endgame 175
  • Book VII - Head-To-Head at Madrid 212
  • Book VIII - The Political Battle 251
  • Conclusion 289
  • Notes 307
  • Index 361
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