Post-Modernism and the Social Sciences: Insights, Inroads, and Intrusions

By Pauline Marie Rosenau | Go to book overview

tic support and unwavering encouragement over the years that I spent writing this book. An author, a professor and now a playwright, he nourished my interest in post-modernism from the start. His words of encouragement sustained me through the difficult periods; he made the difference.

I also wish to acknowledge with much appreciation the many friends, colleagues, and students who have read and commented on particular portions of this book over the last several years, most particularly Richard

Ashley, Harry and Maryliz Bredemeier, Robert Cox, Michael Dear, Isabelle Grunberg, Howard Kendler, and Barbara Rosecrance. The students at the University of Quebec who took my course, "Forces sociales et vie politique," those enrolled in my seminar on post-modernism at the University of California at Irvine where I was a visiting professor, Spring 1988, and those currently at the University of Southern California, all contributed to the ongoing discussion of the issues addressed in this book. I am grateful to Lisa Nowak Jerry, who competently, carefully, and expeditiously edited the manuscript. Finally, Stephen Schecter, Jean-Guy Vaillancourt, and Erica Verba assisted in proofing the final printed version. A special word of thanks in this respect goes to my daughter, Véronique Vaillancourt.

Inasmuch as I am a "modern" author I assume, of course, "responsibility" for this text and for whatever "errors" remain. I hope my readers will not be too frisky with their interpretations of my text. I want to specifically discourage efforts to "re-invent" this text through the "very act of reading."

NOTE: Pauline Marie Rosenau is Professor of Political Science at the University of Quebec—Montreal. She formerly wrote under the name Pauline Vaillancourt.

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