Post-Modernism and the Social Sciences: Insights, Inroads, and Intrusions

By Pauline Marie Rosenau | Go to book overview

INDEX
absence, 22, 36. See also presence
accountability, 32–33
action, 157n.See also social movements
action research, 117
activist post-modernists. See affirmative post-modernists
administration, 131
advocacy, 171
affirmative post-modernism: definition of, 14—17; compared to skeptical post-modernism, 174
affirmative post-modernists
—author, 31
—communication, 178
—consistency and political relevance, choice between, 175
—deconstruction: critique of, 124; interpretation and, 118
—epistemology: general views of, 23, 109; normative preferences, 23; reason, 23, 130, 132–33; on truth and social science, 86; values, 114–15; view of reality, 110– 11; views of theory, 77; views of truth, 22, 77, 80–81
—geography, 69–70
—history, 66, 72; End-of-History movement, 63; New History, 66
—law: definition of, 125; post-modern forms of, 127
—methodology, views of, 23, 109, 117, 123
—politics: on democracy, 22–23, 145; political action, 145–48; political orientations, 24, 144–55, 173; political participation, 145; and post-modernism, 166; on public sphere theory, 23, 100, 102–3; and social science, 138. See also social movements
—reader: role of, 40; view of, 39
—representation: and democracy, 93–94, 98–100, 107–8; general views of, 22–23, 93–94, 96; in the social sciences, 105
—science: critique of modern science, 169; post-modern, 123–24
—social science: 23; compromises with, 181—82; influence on post-modern forms of, 169–73; views of theory, 22, 80–81, 82–84
—space, 69–70, 72
—standards of evaluation, 136. See also evaluation
—subject: general views of, 21, 42, 44, 52– 53; return of, 56–60
—text, 35–36
—time, 72
—types of: activist, 145–48; extreme forms, 4–5, 16, 19–20, 169, 180; moderate forms, 183; New Age, 148–52; Third World, 152–55
affluence, 11, 153
agency, xii, 32–33, 47, 117n, 158, 163, 168. See also author
agent, xi, 26, 46, 170
Agger, Ben, 16n, 57, 57n, 101, 103, 103n, 156, 161n
agnosticism, 168
AIDS, 111
alchemy, 151
Amnesty International, 147n
anarchism, 13, 144, 160n
Anglo-North America, 15
animal rights, 144
anthropology, 4, 7, 21–23, 27, 40, 51, 85, 87–88, 105, 106, 107, 119, 123, 167, 172. See also ethnography
anti-abortion, 145
anti-democratic perspective, 139. See also democracy
anti-foundation al predispositions, 81
antihumanism, 12–13. See also humanism
anti-intellectualism, 13, 55, 132–33
anti-nuclear movements, 168
anti-positive empiricism, 83
anti-representationalism. See representation
anti-subject, 42. See also subject
apocalyptic destruction, 183
architecture, 7, 7n, 127; and laws of science, 127n
armed forces, 157
Aronowitz, Stanley, 160, 164
art, 7, 94, 142

-217-

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