Shakespeare's Brain: Reading with Cognitive Theory

By Mary Thomas Crane | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

AN EARLIER version of chapter 2 was published as “Linguistic Change, Theatrical Practice, and the Ideologies of Status in As You Like It” in English Literary Renaissance 27 (1997): 361–92; an earlier version of chapter 5 appeared as “Male Pregnancy and Cognitive Permeability in Measure for Measure,” Shakespeare Quarterly 49 (1998): 269–92. Both are reprinted here with permission.

I have benefited from the help and support of a great many people, both far and near, in writing this book. The small but growing group of scholars working on the intersections of literature and cognitive science welcomed a newcomer with warmth and generosity. Mark Turner, Ellen Spolsky, Francis Steen, and F. Elizabeth Hart all provided immensely helpful comments at different stages of this work. I am also grateful to Renaissance scholars whose range of responses to this project—excitement, skepticism, bemusement—sharpened its focus. Heather Dubrow and Barbara Kiefer Lewalski provided advice and support as always. Lars Engle, Julian Yates, Lauren Shohet, Douglas Bruster, and Katherine Rowe helped me think about this work in relation to several relevant areas of early modern studies. The interest, encouragement, and persistent questions of Judith Anderson and Gail Kern Paster helped this book find its shape. Emily Bartels, Laura Knoppers, and Naomi Miller are still the best and most dependable friends, readers, fonts of wisdom, telephone chatters, and conference mates anyone could have.

This book has grown from roots firmly planted at Boston College. First, an imperative to teach Shakespeare and more Shakespeare led me to contemplate his brain in the first place, and a sabbatical gave me the time to begin the project. Graduate students Mary Jo Kietzman, Carla Spivack, Matthew Watson, and Elizabeth Bradburn challenged and furthered my thinking in many ways. Other colleagues—James Najarian, Robert Stanton, Laura Tanner, and Elizabeth Kowaleski Wallace—contributed expertise on far-flung topics. My colleagues Amy Boesky and Dayton Haskin have made Boston College a true Renaissance Utopia. Shakespeare's Brain owes a great deal to Alan Richardson, who alternately goaded and encouraged my interest in cognitive science and my progress on this book; our coauthored essay “Literary Studies and Cognitive Science” was a crucial first step, and his own work has been a model of precision and thoroughness at every point. Rosemarie Bodenheimer and Andrew Von Hendy have helped me, and this book, in more ways than I can possibly

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