Shakespeare's Brain: Reading with Cognitive Theory

By Mary Thomas Crane | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
Shakespeare's Brain: Embodying the Author-Function
1
Michel Foucault, “What Is an Author?” in Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews by Michel Foucault, ed. Donald F. Bouchard (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1977), 113.
2
G. Wilson Knight, “On the Principles of Shakespeare Interpretation,” from The Wheel of Fire, as excerpted in Modern Shakespearean Criticism: Essays on Style, Dramaturgy, and the Major Plays, ed. Alvin B. Kernan (New York: Harcourt, 1970), 5.
3
A full bibliography of psychoanalytic criticism of Shakespeare is clearly beyond the scope of a single note. A very basic list might include C. L. Barber and Richard P. Wheeler, The Whole Journey: Shakespeare's Power of Development (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1986); Meredith Anne Skura, Shakespeare the Actor and the Purposes of Playing (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993); Janet Adelman, Suffocating Mothers: Fantasies of Maternal Origin in Shakespeare's Plays, Hamlet to The Tempest (New York: Routledge, 1992); Norman Holland, Psychoanalysis and Shakespeare (New York: McGrawHill, 1966); and Murray Schwartz and Coppélia Kahn, eds., Representing Shakespeare: New Psychoanalytic Essays (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980).
4
As George Lakoff puts it, “Because concepts and reason both derive from, and make use of, the sensorimotor system, the mind is not separate from or independent of the body” (George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought [New York: Basic Books, 1999], 555).
5
It would not be possible to acknowledge all of those working to apply cognitive approaches to literature. Ellen Spolsky and F. Elizabeth Hart have done important work on the relevance of cognitive science for reading Shakespeare. Spolsky offers a chapter on Hamlet in Gaps in Nature: Literary Interpretation and the Modular Mind (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993) and more extended treatment of Coriolanus and Othello in Satisfying Skepticism: The Evolved Mind in the Early Modern World (forthcoming). Hart offers groundbreaking theoretical work as well as readings of Shakespeare in “Cognitive Linguistics: The Experiential Dynamics of Metaphor,” Mosaic 28 (1995): 645–58, and “Matter, System, and Early Modern Studies: Outlines for a Materialist Linguistics,” Configurations 6 (1998): 311–43. Bruce Smith's largely phenomenological approach to the materiality of sound in The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999) has much in common with the cognitive theories that I use here and calls on some

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