Authority and Upheaval in Leipzig, 1910-1920: The Story of a Relationship

By Sean Dobson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

IT PLEASES ME to thank publicly the individuals and institutions without whose help this project would not have been possible. A President's Fellowship from Columbia University (known as the Hofstadter Fellowship inside the history department) enabled my graduate career. The German Academic Exchange Service financed a year of research in Germany during which Professors Heinrich August Winkler and Martin Geyer provided advice. There I also benefited from the helpfulness of archivists at the Landeshauptarchiv Magdeburg (as well as its Außenstelle in Wernigerode), Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Leipzig im alten Rathaus, Sächsisches Hauptstaatsarchiv Dresden, Sächsisches Staatsarchiv Leipzig, Stadtarchiv Leipzig, and the Zentrales Betriebsarchiv der Leuna-Werke, as well as from the librarians of the Deutsche Bücherei, the Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig, Stadtbibliothek Leipzig, Bibliothek des Dimitrov-Museums, and the Staatsbibliothek in Berlin. Pastors at the Thomaskirche and Kirche der Hohen Thekla, both in Leipzig, allowed me to examine the archives of those churches. Administrators at the HumboldtUniversität in Berlin and Universität Leipzig patiently explained the intricacies of matriculation, etc. A special thanks to the Vorwerk family in Leipzig for taking me into their home and under their wing. I also wish to thank the Robert Bosch Stiftung for widening my acquaintance with today's Germany and permitting me to participate, as a spouse, in many of the activities in its program for young American professionals. Professor Eberhard Kolb read the entire manuscript very carefully, as did my advisers at Columbia, Professors Istvan Deak, David Cannadine, Andreas Huyssen, Ira Katznelson, and Robert Paxton. Their suggestions improved the early drafts a great deal. My

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