Authority and Upheaval in Leipzig, 1910-1920: The Story of a Relationship

By Sean Dobson | Go to book overview

chapter 13
THE KAPP-LÜTTWITZ PUTSCH AND THE END OF THE REVOLUTION:
JANUARY—APRIL 1920

BY EARLY 1920 the relationship between workers and nonworkers in Leipzig— and throughout Germany, for that matter—had not yet achieved the kind of stability that would allow one to conclude that the revolution was over. Among workers, a series of developments during these months bred increasing frustration and bitterness, a discontent so profound that—even without the provocation of the Kapp-Lüttwitz Putsch—they might well have relaunched an aggressive Works Council movement. Meanwhile, large numbers of nonworkers believed the moment ripe to topple the new republic and win back many of their old privileges by force. After the failure of this assault from the right in March 1920, both sides were too exhausted to attempt, for the time being, any further revisions. With this provisional firming of the relationship between workers and Bürger, my study reaches its conclusion at the end of this chapter.


DISAPPOINTMENT AND TENSION ON THE EVE OF THE
KAPP-LÜTTWITZ PUTSCH

In the preceding chapter I observed how the German government—servicing its gargantuan war debt by printing ever more money and offering shortterm notes to the public at high interest rates—created slowly building inflation throughout 1919. A number of international influences caused this climbing but manageable rate of inflation to explode in early 1920. To beat back war-related inflation in its own country, the U.S. government sent the

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