Authority and Upheaval in Leipzig, 1910-1920: The Story of a Relationship

By Sean Dobson | Go to book overview

appendix 2
SOURCES AND METHOD USED FOR SOCIAL ANALYSIS
OF IMPERIAL LEIPZIG

IN PART 1 I perform a number of social analyses (for geographical mobility, social mobility, etc.) that take their raw data from the Adreβbücher and to a lesser extent from the police department's register of inhabitants (Polizeimeldebücher), as well as from church records. In the body of the book I specify any provisos regarding individual tests. All the tests, however, share a number of common features that, in order to avoid repetition, I discuss here.

Because the Adreβbücher designate only “head of household,” while the Polizeimeldebücher rarely name a woman's occupation (listing her usually as “wife”), most of the social analysis in chapter 1 examines only male Leipzigers. This was regrettable but unavoidable. Women were included, however, in samples taken from church records because these usually listed the woman's occupation or that of her father.

I excluded anybody with both a non-German family name and Christian name. Such people were probably foreign migrant workers and therefore much more likely to quit the city than ethnic Germans. Also omitted from consideration were occupations that provide no clue about that person's social position. Was a Privatmann/Privata a wealthy or poor retiree? To which social group does a Feldwebel (sergeant), Polizist (police officer), or Witwe (widow) belong?

The Adreβbücher and Polizeimeldebücher provide skewed data. New arrivals to Leipzig were supposed to report to the police for registry in the Polizeimeldebücher and then report again if they changed address. But many poor in-migrants did not bother because, in the absence of secure employ-

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