Introduction

Times Square, the “Center of the World,” has emerged from years of tawdriness into the new polish of digitally triggered billboard systems. Pornography and prostitution have slunk away. Bright multiplexes, worthy of the best suburban mall, have replaced dingy urban movie theaters. Mickey Mouse and other beloved Disney characters have taken over from the rats and roaches.

On December 31, 1999, the dramatic lowering of a new Waterford crystal ball marked the beginning of the third millennium. Predictions of Y2K terrorism never materialized at that happier time, because appropriate precautions had been taken; because, as was generally felt, there was less cause for fear; because of luck; or perhaps all the above. Despite what the more puritanical may have perceived as unruliness and lawlessness, most saw the revelry and flaunting of liquor laws as exuberance befitting the occasion, which is how the police, expecting the best but prepared for the worst, also seemed to perceive it.

In pre-millennium but post-television New Year's celebrations, the dropping of the ball at Times Square commemorates the new year even for those who are not present. Thousands watch TV as the ball descends and reaches its target destination. Distant gatherings and parties pause before the television set to see the ball drop.

What holds for any New Year held brilliantly for the singular New Year that marked the millennium, not least because of the revolution in telecommunication technologies that made worldwide celebrations of the new mil

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Assault on Social Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Assault on Social Policy *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • The Assault on Social Policy *
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Policy 9
  • 2 - Corporations 24
  • 3 - Poverty 46
  • 4 - Welfare 63
  • 5 - Disability 78
  • 6 - Social Security 94
  • 7 - Health 107
  • 8 - Children 125
  • 9 - Outsiders 141
  • 10 - Democratic Change 156
  • Notes 173
  • Index 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 193

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.