Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities

By Stephen D. Krasner | Go to book overview

8
Belarus and the Flight from Sovereignty
COIT BLACKER AND CONDOLEEZZA RICE

Given half a chance, most national communities will seek the highest degree of political autonomy and self-determination, up to and including de jure independence (or international legal sovereignty, to use the term employed throughout this volume). They do so in large measure on the basis of the conviction that as a unique people—ethnically, linguistically, and/or culturally distinct from all others—they have earned and thus deserve such status, and because, in the end, the only surefire way to protect themselves against oppression and exploitation at the hands of others is through self-rule. 1 Historically, few such communities, when presented with the opportunity to chart their own sovereign course, have declined to take on the challenge. 2 That many of those efforts ended disastrously should not obscure the larger point that state-seeking nationalism has been, and remains, an enormously potent force in contemporary world politics.

What are we to make, then, of Belarus, one of twelve New Independent States to emerge from the wreckage of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991, which has made political and economic union with the Russian Federation— a development that, if implemented, would surely diminish various aspects of Belarusian sovereignty—the centerpiece of its national policy?

Most new states go to elaborate lengths to imbed, affirm, and otherwise demonstrate their newly attained status as independent actors. They lower the old flag and raise the new. They field an army and begin printing their own money. They apply for membership in the United Nations and dispatch the foreign minister to Washington for “urgent consultations.”

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 367

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.