The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy, and International Conflict

By Stephen M. Saideman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This project began as my dissertation, which I started shortly before the disintegration of Yugoslavia. The initial hope of the dissertation was to help understand what might happen if the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia collapsed. Ironically, I am not too late—as I revised the penultimate version, the Western countries intervened in Kosovo, breaking up de facto, if not de jure, the rump Yugoslav state. Further, the former Soviet Union is still disintegrating as the Chechnya conflict continues. In the time it has taken for me to complete this book, I have benefited from the assistance of many people.

The first debts I would like to acknowledge are to those who fostered the dissertation from which this book has sprung. The Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation's Dissertation Fellowship funded my initial work on this project. Several people at IGCC, including the former directors, John Ruggie and Susan Shirk, as well as Sue Greer, Bettina Halverson, Jennifer Pournelle, and Kat Archibald, patiently answered my questions, and helped me in more ways than I can remember.

I am grateful to those who provided me with data and helped me analyze this data. Ted Robert Gurr, Anne Pitsch, Deepa Khosa, and The Center for International Development and Conflict Management at the University of Maryland have generously given me access to the Minorities at Risk Dataset, including raw data they collected. They also provided substantial assistance in using the dataset. Chapter six simply would not exist without their help. I am grateful to Douglas Van Belle, as he helped me develop my indicators

-ix-

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