Art Lessons: Learning from the Rise and Fall of Public Arts Funding

By Alice Goldfarb Marquis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

IN THE JOURNEY of discovery in writing this book, I was fortunate to find many and varied companions. Some generously shared what they knew; others refreshed my enthusiasm for the project, listened patiently to half-baked theories and tentative speculations, or provided much-needed distraction from my work. Still others housed me, fed me, typed my notes, and pointed me in fruitful directions.

My home base, the University of California at San Diego, continues to offer warm hospitality to this independent scholar. The history department annually renews my status as a visiting scholar, providing me with indispensable faculty privileges at the university library. There, the staff, in particular Susannah Galloway, graciously fulfilled even the most bizarre requests. My mentor and friend, Stuart Hughes, remains, as always, a willing reader and gentle critic.

Many colleagues in San Diego Independent Scholars served as an informal academic department, most notably Jane Ford, Aline Hornaday, and Marian Steinberg. Further support came from that most stimulating crowd in the National Coalition of Independent Scholars. Others who may have been victimized by my years-long obsession include Sue Whitman, Sue Keller, Phil Melling, Charlotte and Martin Stern, the late Henry Stern, and Norma Sullivan.

The typists who turned my scribbled comments and highlighted papers into usable note cards were Karen Pomeroy and Bonnie and Lee Merritt. My son, John Blankfort, remains not only a source of great pride but also a

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Art Lessons: Learning from the Rise and Fall of Public Arts Funding
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Art Lessons - Learning from the Rise and Fall of Public Arts Funding *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • 1 - Seventy-Six Trombones *
  • 2 - West Side Story *
  • 3 - A Man for All Seasons *
  • 4 - The Nutcracker *
  • 5 - The Sorcerer's Apprentice *
  • 6 - A Night at the Opera *
  • 7 - Flowers of Evil *
  • 8 - The Beggar's Opera *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
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