The Two French Revolutions, 1789-1796

By Guglielmo Ferrero; Luc Monnier et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
The Uprising
of June 2, 1793

To the loss of Belgium and the defection of Dumouriez was added the insurrection in the Vendée. The economic situation worsened and the inflation grew, for the war had forced the government to multiply the emission of assignats. The landowners refused to sell their grain for paper money. In his book, La Vie chère sous la Terreur, Albert Mathiez cites the reports that came from all the departments reiterating the same message: the stores are empty; bread is scarce; the masses are in turmoil, demonstrations are multiplying. "Give us a king, but more than that, give us bread," was the general cry. The commissioners of the Convention sent to the provinces to oversee

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The Two French Revolutions, 1789-1796
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Two French Revolutions 1789-1796 *
  • Foreword v
  • Editor's Preface xiii
  • Contents *
  • Part I - The First Revolution *
  • Chapter 1 - The Collapse of Monarchical Legitimacy 3
  • Chapter 2 - The Constituent Assembly 30
  • Chapter 3 - The Revolution and Europe 66
  • Chapter 4 - The Convention 97
  • Chapter 5 - The Uprising of June 2, 1793 131
  • Part II - The Second Revolution *
  • Chapter 1 - The Revolutionary Government 155
  • Chapter 2 - Robespierre 183
  • Chapter 3 - The Thermidorian Reaction 203
  • Index 229
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