Fifty Years of Communism: Theory and Practice, 1917-1967

By G. F. Hudson | Go to book overview

I
JACOBIN AND COMMUNIST

IN the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries France provided the continent of Europe with its model of monarchical power and courtly elegance; in the nineteenth she provided the model of popular revolution. The myth of the French Revolution was the inspiration of all those who in the years between the end of the Napoleonic Empire in 1815 and the revolutionary upheavals of 1848 sought to bring about radical changes in the established political and social order. Paris in those years, even though it was the seat first of the restored Bourbons and then of the "bourgeois monarchy" of Louis Philippe, remained the Mecca of all the revolutionaries of Europe, for it was the city which possessed within itself the tradition of the Great Revolution and continued to be the hotbed of radical political thought.

It is at first sight something of a paradox that a historical period which had violently broken with the traditional values and institutions of its society should have itself created so powerful a tradition. But so it was; for those to whom the brief rule of the French revolutionary democracy was not a dire example of what to avoid it was the pattern of success to be regained. Europe might have fallen back under the domination of royal autocracies or narrow oligarchies, but what had been done could be done again and the sovereignty of the people once more established in all its power and glory. The Bastille could again be captured; there could be another Robespierre and another Marat. Those who in the eighteen forties were moved by the ideal of democracy—an ideal

-i-

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Fifty Years of Communism: Theory and Practice, 1917-1967
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Fifty Years of Communism - Theory and Practice I9i7-1967 *
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I - Jacobin and Communist i
  • II - Social Democracy and the Non-Revolution 14
  • III - Marxism and the Russian Narodniks 27
  • IV - Lenin 38
  • V - The Capture of Power in Russia 50
  • VI - Foreign Intervention and Civil War 63
  • VII - The Comintern 76
  • VIII - The Retreat from Socialism 87
  • IX - Stalin and the Revolution from Above 97
  • X - Stalin and the Great Purge 110
  • XI - The Rise of Communism in China 124
  • XII - The Idea of the Popular Front 135
  • XIII - Communism and the Second World War 146
  • XIV - Communism and the Cold War 157
  • XV - Russian Communism after Stalin 166
  • XVI - Peaceful Coexistence 175
  • XVII - Polycentrism 184
  • XVIII - Maoism 194
  • XIX - Communism and the Third World 206
  • XX - Fifty Years After 217
  • Select Bibliography 226
  • Index 231
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