Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture

By John S. Bowman | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 1
National/Independence Days

BANGLADESH

March 26: Independence Day. On this date in 1971, a group of Bengali nationalists made a radio broadcast calling for East Pakistan to become independent from Pakistan. On April 17, leaders of the breakaway East Pakistan openly and more formally declared independence as Bangladesh. After the war that ensued, the West Pakistan army was forced to surrender to the forces of India on December 16, 1971, and this day is observed in Bangladesh as Victory (or National) Day. East Pakistan thus became Bangladesh, although Pakistan did not formally recognize this status until February 22, 1974.


BHUTAN

December 17: National Day. On this date in 1907, the powerful warlord Ugyen Wangchuk declared himself first king of Bhutan. Although technically an independent land for all of its history, Bhutan had in fact long been under the rule of Tibet and then to some degree under China. By the nineteenth century, Great Britain, through its governance of India, had also begun to take control of Bhutan's affairs, and Britain continued to exercise considerable control over Bhutan's affairs even after Wangchuk's declaration. Finally on August 2, 1935, Britain gave Bhutan autonomy from British India's princely states. On August 8, 1949, India began to assume responsibility for Bhutan's foreign affairs, defense, and economy.

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Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture *
  • Contents v
  • Consultants and Contributors vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture *
  • Part One - East Asia 1
  • China - Political History 3
  • China - Arts, Culture, Thought, and Religion 79
  • China - Science-Technology, Economics, and Everyday Life 99
  • Japan - Political History 118
  • Japan - Arts, Culture, Thought, and Religion 162
  • Japan - Science-Technology, Economics, and Everyday Life 179
  • Korea 193
  • Taiwan 225
  • Hong Kong 236
  • Macau (Macao) 244
  • Part Two - South Asia 250
  • India - Political History 251
  • India - Arts, Culture, Thought, and Religion 325
  • India - Science-Technology, Economics, and Everyday Life 355
  • Pakistan 370
  • Bangladesh 379
  • Bhutan 384
  • Maldives 389
  • Nepal 393
  • Sri Lanka (Ceylon) 400
  • Part Three - Southeast Asia 408
  • Brunei 409
  • Cambodia 415
  • Indonesia 436
  • Laos 452
  • Malaysia 465
  • Myanmar (Burma) 476
  • The Philippines 488
  • Singapore 501
  • Thailand 506
  • Vietnam 521
  • Part Four - Central Asia 545
  • Mongolia 547
  • Central Asian Republics 566
  • Tibet 577
  • Appendix 1 - National/Independence Days 583
  • Appendix 2 - Scientific-Technological Achievements in Asia 590
  • Appendix 3 - Asian History: a Chronological Overview 603
  • Index 679
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