Acknowledgments

The essays in this book were first prepared as papers for a conference held at the University of Michigan, and they have benefited in revision from the discussions that took place there. Many valuable points that now nestle in these chapters, as well as the sense of discovery often reflected in them, owe much to the participation of scholars who do not appear here as authors: Rajen S. Anand, Director, Program Development, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, United States Department of Agriculture; Professor Robin Barlow, Professor of Economics and Population Planning, University of Michigan; Professor Alison Cornish, Department of Romance Languages, University of Michigan; Professor John D'Arms, President, American Council of Learned Societies; Professor Stanley Garn, Emeritus, School of Public Health, University of Michigan; Professor Kenneth Kiple, of History, Bowling Green University; Dr. Rachel Laudan, Mexico; Professor Harvey Levenstein, Department of History, McMaster University; Professor Bruce Mazlish, Department of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Professor Marion Nestle, Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, New York University; Professor Paul Rozin, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania; Professor Wolf Schäfer, Department of History, SUNY-Stony Brook; Professor Thomas N. Tentler, Department of History, University of Michigan; Professor Rafia Zafar, Department of English and Afro-American Studies, Washington University. We want especially to acknowledge the spirited participation of Dr. Gerald Gaull, Director, Center for Food and Nutrition Policy, Georgetown University, whose sudden death prevented his completing his essay and who is very much missed.

The conference was prepared by a committee consisting of Alison Cornish, Adam Drewnowski, and Raymond Grew, with special help from John D'Arms, Homer Rose, James Schaefer, and Steven Soper; and it was part of a theme semester at the University of Michigan, which featured a score of courses on food in global history taught in nearly as many departments, in addition to a lecture series, a film series, and special exhibits in the Clements Library (featuring the Jan Longone collection of American cookbooks published in each of the last two hundred years), the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, and the University of Michigan Museum of Art. These activities were an invaluable stimulus to the entire project and brought a well-informed audience to the conference itself.

-ix-

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