Beyond the Firm: Business Groups in International and Historical Perspective

By Takao Shiba; Masahiro Shimotani | Go to book overview

6
Business Groups in the German Electrical Industry

WILFRIED FELDENKIRCHEN


Big Business and Business Groups in the Context of Recent Research into the History of Corporations

The international debate on the phenomenon of big business has been linked directly for several decades to research into American business history and to the name of Alfred D. Chandler, who produced the first comprehensive hypotheses on the development of large corporations. The empirical content of these hypotheses constituted a challenge to produce an international and intertemporal comparison, as they claimed, expressis verbis, not only to be applicable to the USA but also to the highly industrialized states of west and central Europe and Japan. 1

Studies have been carried out into the development of corporations in Germany along the same lines as Chandler's, who was able to verify his theoretical constructs through examples taken from major US enterprises. 2 In an international context the question of which forms big business took still tends to be viewed against the background of the three 'big' industrial nations at the end of the nineteenth century. On balance, Britain, Germany, and the USA appear not to have undergone the same process of development, but one which is similar in orientation and derives its own particular character from unique and specific aspects. 3 With an eye on Japan, an interesting problem arises with regard to the period in question: even though distinct horizontal and vertical concentration was manifest in Germany in the period examined, there was neither extensive lateral diversification, nor were conglomerates formed in the manner typical of the Japanese zaibatsu. 4

The object of this account is therefore. to describe the form taken by business groups in Germany--specifically, in the German electrical industry-- their expansion strategies, and the underlying corporate structures. Two limitations must be made in order to achieve this object. The compound

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond the Firm: Business Groups in International and Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Contributors ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • List of Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The History and Structure of Business Groups in Japan 5
  • Part I - The Corporate Complex 29
  • 2 - Diversification Process and the Ownership Structure of Samsung Chaebol 31
  • Introduction 31
  • Notes 55
  • 3 - From Zaibatsu to Corporate Complexes 59
  • Introduction 59
  • Conclusion 85
  • References 86
  • 4 - Structure and Strategy of Belgian Business Groups (1920-1990) 88
  • Conclusion 104
  • References 105
  • Part II - The Corporate Group 107
  • 5 - Growth Via Politics: Business Groups Italian-Style 109
  • Introduction 109
  • Notes 132
  • References 133
  • 6 - Business Groups in the German Electrical Industry 135
  • 7 - A Path to the Corporate Group in Japan: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Its Group Formation 167
  • Introduction 167
  • Conclusion 181
  • Notes 182
  • Bibliography 182
  • Part III - Assembler-Supplier Relations 185
  • 8 'Japanese-Style' Supplier Relationships in the American Auto Industry, 1895-1920 187
  • Conclusion - Japanese-Style' Supplier Relations? 208
  • References 213
  • 9 - The Subcontracting System and Business Groups: the Case of the Japanese Automotive Industry 215
  • Conclusion 239
  • Notes 240
  • References 241
  • Part IV - Japanese Business Groups 243
  • 10 - The Organizational Logic of Business Groups: Evidence from the Zaibatsu 245
  • Conclusion 270
  • Notes 271
  • References 272
  • 11 - Learning to Work Together: Adaptation and the Japanese Firm 274
  • References 288
  • Afterword 291
  • Notes 295
  • Index 297
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.