Cyprus and Its People: Nation, Identity, and Experience in an Unimaginable Community, 1955-1997

By Vangelis Calotychos | Go to book overview

But in a small community such as Cyprus, close surveillance and control function not in the service of the "scientific" state (though of course the British tried to use it for that, as well) but in the service of the definition of minute networks of interdependence of such a society. While methods of education have helped redefine the relation of individual and state in Cyprus, the advent of modernity has not been accompanied by the subjective individualism that has defined it elsewhere. As a result, foreigners in Cyprus or Cypriots attempting social science research there often observe with wonder and bafflement the manner in which personal narratives appear to conform to official ones. The modern links between governance and epistemology in Cyprus are thus revealed through analysis of morality and its education, for it is moral discipline which defines the citizen.

In contrast to the Western European educational model analyzed by Foucault, the Greek schools of Cyprus did not practice a discipline that was a process of objectification of the individual and the body, but one of subjectification, one in which the individual is not calculable but malleable, in which the student is not exhorted to control himself in relation to himself, but to control himself in relation to others. To put it another way, the discipline described by Foucault is one in which the notion of "evolutive," linear progress calls for an indefinite segmentation of time and control of it. However, the Greek Cypriot notion of progress, being inevitable, was in fact static--it was not a history that could be made. One finds, then, not a control exercised over time and one's disposal of it, but a control exercised over individual experience in a history which is timeless--a minute delimitation of the boundaries of the individual in relation to society rather than a micro-control of development. History cannot change, and one's experiences must conform to it, even in the future.


Notes
1.
This paper is based on fieldwork and archival research conducted in southern Cyprus from September 1993 to December 1994 and in northern Cyprus from February to October 1995, as well as on research in the archive of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Athens, in January 1995. I would like to express my gratitude for the generous support of the following programs: the Social Science Research Council International Predissertation Fellowship with funding from the Ford Foundation; the United States Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Fellowship; the Institute for International Exchange Fulbright Fellowship, and the U.S. Department of Education Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship. I also wish to thank the organizers and participants of the symposium, "Cyprus and Its People: New Interdisciplinary Perspectives," who gave me insightful comments on an earlier version of the paper. Kostas Kazazis was very obliging in checking my translations of katharevousa Greek.
2.
Such, at least, was the opinion of Turkish Cypriot journalists, who were careful observers of Greek Cypriot politics. See, in particular, articles in "Bozkurt" and "Istiklal"

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cyprus and Its People: Nation, Identity, and Experience in an Unimaginable Community, 1955-1997
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.