Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

Preface

MINORITY problems cover the range of social life, and there are many minority groups in the United States. The difficulty of adequately representing all the problems of all the groups is obvious, and the goal cannot be achieved. Space is limited, and the literature is much more complete on some subjects than on others. Some good pieces should not be reprinted if they are generally available and if still better pieces on the same, subject can be used. There is a value in reprinting pieces from out-of- the-way publications and in giving a first printing to articles that have never before been published. The editor has had to mediate among these and other conflicting claims on his judgment.

In the essential effort to save space, and yet include as large a number of valuable pieces as possible, it was necessary to cut something from every piece. Footnotes containing bibliographic or comparative data, text paragraphs or even whole sections containing illustrations or points tangential to the main theme, most charts and many tables were the items deleted. Yet a strong effort was made to preserve intact the basic thesis or major description as the author originally planned it. Few of the pieces are "excerpts"; most are rather self-contained units. The hope is earnestly expressed that the authors will forgive the deletions from their creations in the interest of presenting a well-rounded book.

The structure of the volume is made clear by the table of contents. The first part seeks to define the problem and give a rough sketch of the historical origin or present condition of the problem for the outstanding minority groups. The second part illustrates specific discriminations against minority groups. Part three takes up the group life of minorities and the reaction of these groups to discrimination. Part four goes into the various attempts to explain the causes of the problem. The final part considers various philosophies and techniques for changing the situation.

Considerable effort has been devoted to integrating the work and making it a systematic whole, not only through a careful

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