Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

will become dominant in American culture. And the distance to the day after tomorrow, is a short span in the life of a church whose unit of measurement is the century.


FACING THE FUTURE

On the other hand, Protestants may discover that their greatest contribution to American culture is not in the past but awaits the future. Our sixteenth century forebears were compelled to brush aside the priestly façade of medieval Christianity patterned after imperial Rome to recover the central structure of living faith which was given to the world in first century Palestine. We can do that better than they, thanks to modern scholarship. We are also better equipped to appraise the peril which the authoritarian principle holds for modern society. We have better reason to know that the thing which made our fathers break with Rome is today far more important than are any of the issues which separate Protestant from Protestant. The faith which once molded the pattern of American national life, and has also shaped the character of other cultures, still lives. . . .


8(b.). Freedom and Catholic Authority *

John B. Sheerin, C.S.P.

Certain liberal magazines refer to the conflict between the Church and Communism as a death struggle between two monsters, the Red Dragon of Moscow and the Black Dragon of Rome. Free men everywhere, so they say, can look upon the tussle with the hope that the two totalitarian beasts will exterminate each other. For are not the Romans and the Russians the same blood- thirsty, power-hungry breed?

In other circles we meet with a mild suspicion of Roman Catholicism. Someone phrased it: "We smashed Hitler only to find that we had built up Stalin. Are we going to war against Stalin only to find that we are building up the power of the Pope?"

Such an attitude, in the face of the onrushing Red imperialism, is shortsighted and incredibly stupid. But to be able to understand

____________________
*
From The Catholic World, 171 ( April, 1950), 1-5. Copyright 1950 by The Catholic World. Reprinted by permission of The Catholic World.

-73-

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