Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

apathy to things French and Canadian. He calls for union among them. Here too, as among other minority groups, the second and third generations are less and less enthusiastic about the institutions of their forebears. The most serious problems seem to grow out of the lessening of interest in religion and language. English and Protestantism are making inroads on old and cherished institutions. In fact, it is possible that in spite of his high ideal to preserve his culture and language intact, the French Canadian may become amalgamated into the great American people. If this does take place, a colorful group, with its songs, stories, and lusty joy of living, will be lost to our civilization.

Politics . The French Canadians have held every position of major political importance in the United States with the exception of the presidency and a justiceship on the Supreme Court bench. Their political strength is not uniform throughout the country, but where they are densely settled, their influence is considerable. In Manchester, New Hampshire, for example, they are strong with an estimated 14,000 voters, and they control roughly about 45 percent of the total vote of the city. It is inevitable, in view of what has been said, that such a group should tend to be politically unified and that it should band together for political influence; yet in all fairness it should be observed that that influence has not been used to capture all the important political offices, which it might easily have done. On the other hand, the Franco-American bloc is a substantial power, not only in Manchester but throughout New Hampshire, and is of increasing importance in the other New England States. . . .


10. The Puerto Rican in New York City *

Warren Brown

[ Since Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States, its citizens are also citizens of the United States. Their handicaps--when they migrate to the States--are not those of lack of citizenship, therefore, but of race and language. Racially, they are very much like American Negroes, having an intermixture of Negro, white, and some Indian ancestry. In language they are Spanish, having once been a segment of

____________________
*
From The Communal and Individual Personality Structure of the Puerto Rican in New York, unpublished paper delivered at the Forty-eighth Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association ( November, 1949). Printed by courtesy of the author.

-91-

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