Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

that in many of the economic fields covered, estimates of Jewish economic power in a specific field were submitted by firms or individuals connected with that activity. The few categories wherein sources are named suggest that at least in some instances these estimates of Jewish participation were derived from one organization or (as was the case in one phase of the investment picture) from a single individual.

It is apparent also that the survey concerned itself more with the situation in New York City than elsewhere. The aforementioned discussion of Jewish influence in the medical and legal professions, for example, dealt solely with the situation in New York City. While it is true that there are more Jews in New York City than in any other area, it is also probable that the previously mentioned "created role" springs largely from metropolitan areas like New York. What would be of great value is a study of Jewish economic patterns in the larger cities, excluding New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago--especially in the industrial cities in the South, Midwest, and Far West, which received little or no mention in the Fortune study.

On the basis of the foregoing analysis, the question of whether a clear and accurate picture of the Jewish economic position exists is open to serious question.


14. The Decline of Chinatowns in the United States *

Rose Hum Lee

[After the Chinese helped to build the Western railroads and had worked as miners when no one else wished to work in such a lowly occupation, they were forcibly driven into Chinatowns. Life in a Chinatown was more than residential segregation; it also represented occupational segregation. During the period in which Chinese Americans were obliged to live in Chinatowns, from about 1880 to about 1940, the only places where Chinese could find employment were restaurants, hand laundries, and curio shops. During the 1930's, partly as a consequence of increased sympathy towards the Chinese Government and the people in their war against Japan, Chinese in the United States gradually began to become emancipated from the Chinatowns and from the segregated occupations, as Dr. Rose Hum Lee describes.]

____________________
*
From The American Journal of Sociology, 54 ( March, 1949), 422-32. Copyright 1949 by The American Journal of Sociology. Reprinted by permission of The American Journal of Sociology and the author.

-146-

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