Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

And how the Committee worked, a committee that grew from 20 to about 300. They worked long hours on their jobs during the day, stayed longer hours at night, some going home at four o'clock in the morning after having been out to tack up posters, address or stuff envelopes, or make out precinct lists. It was as one man said: "When you believe in something, it even doesn't hurt you to stay up so late, because every day you live is one day less, and we got to make up for lost time.". . . .


III

Election night, after the votes were counted, Roybal had 20,581 votes to Parley Christianson's 12,015.

Thus was a bridge started at the most strategic point--the ballot box--started across the gulf that has separated the American community from its Mexican neighborhood for nearly a century. Perhaps someday a bridge will bring together the life streams of the two communities. The combination of a dream, organization, and hard work had made an important victory possible. Spanish-speaking people in Los Angeles had taken their first big step forward, a step forward from discrimination and injustice. They had also demonstrated anew that justice is never given, it is exacted; freedom is never granted, it is won.


24.Indian Self-Government*

Felix S. Cohen

[ Although they were the original inhabitants of what is now the United States, Indians did not all become American citizens until as late as 1924. Race prejudice and the competition for land made them a deprived minority group. Even when isolated on economically unproductive reservations and granted citizenship, Indians did not have control over their political destiny. Although eligible to vote for President and other Federal offices, most tribes had no control over their local reservation government at all until 1934. They were completely under the control of the Indian Agents of the Federal Government. Since the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934, some of the tribes have established the beginnings of Indian self-government, but they are still subject to the veto of the Secretary of the Interior who is represented for all prac-

____________________
*
From The American Indian, 5 (Second Quarter, 1949), 3-12. Copyright 1949 by The American Indian. Reprinted by permission of The American Indian and the author.

-255-

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