Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

the studies in support of this theory take the form of comparing groups of prejudiced and unprejudiced persons on a number of questions about personality characteristics and personality development. The items where significant differences appear are then integrated into a clinical picture of the prejudiced personality. Using this approach, Frenkel-Brunswick and her colleagues, for example, have discovered the typical anti-Semite to be a compulsive conformist, exhibiting anxiety at the appearance of any social deviation. He appears to be a person with no insight into himself, who projects his own undesired traits onto other people. He has a tendency towards stereotyped thinking and is unimaginative. He has unconscious inferiority feelings centering around a feeling of sexual inadequacy. He expresses strong parental and religious devotion, but unconsciously manifests hatred of parents and social values. He exhibits aversion against emotionalism, but unconsciously has feelings of inferiority toward it. He is prone to aggressive fantasies.

In the following pages, we shall be able to illustrate only a limited number of the causes of prejudice just described.


A.The True Nature of Race and of Ethnic
Personality

41.Race: What It Is and What It Is Not*

Original statement drafted at Unesco House, Paris, by the following experts: Prof. Ernest Beaglehole, New Zealand; Prof. Juan Comas, Mexico; Prof. L. A. Costa Pinto, Brazil; Prof. Franklin Frazier, United States; Prof. Morris Ginsberg, United Kingdom; Dr. Humayun Kabir, India; Prof. Claude Levi-Strauss, France; Prof. Ashley Montagu, United States (Rapporteur). Text revised by Prof. Ashley Montagu, after criticisms submitted by Profs. Hadley Cantril, E. G. Conklin, Gunnar Dahlberg, Theodosius Dobzhansky, L. C. Dunn, Donald Hager, Julian S. Huxley, Otto Klineberg, Wilbert Moore, H. J. Muller, Gunnar Myrdal, Joseph Needham.

[ "Race" is one of the most misunderstood words in any language. It was originally a scientific term and is still used by scientists.

____________________
*
From Congressional Record--Senate, 1950, pages 14562-3.

-432-

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