CHAPTER III
CELTIC EXPANSION ON THE CONTINENT IN THE BRONZE AGE. GOIDELS AND BRYTHONS

I
DID THE GOIDELS TAKE PART IN THE CELTIC MIGRATIONS ON THE CONTINENT? TRACES OF THE GOIDELS IN SPAIN

I N the following chapters we shall consider how the Celtic domain on the Continent was constituted by the extension of the original Celtic domain to the west and south. The Celts met on their south-westward march the same foreign peoples, Iberians and Ligurians, as in the British Isles. But the first question which arises is whether the migrating bodies contained the same Celtic elements and were composed in the same fashion; we already know that the great mass consisted of Gallo-Britons and Belgæ. Did they also include Goidels and Picts? It is an old question which has been revived, but with particular reference to the Goidels.

Zimmer's hypothesis as to the ports from which they sailed 1 implies that they had advanced at least as far as the Loire before they crossed to the British Isles. If we reject it, as I have done, as insufficiently proved, we do not necessarily deny that they went still further without crossing the sea.

But whereas in Ireland the Goidels were preserved by their isolation, and first their power and sovereignty and then their racial character were to a great extent protected by the sea against the encroachment or influence of the other Celts, it could not possibly be so on the Continent, and if any settlement or group which was originally Goidelic survived into historical times we have no means of recognizing it as such. Our task, therefore, is not to look for vanished settlements, but to gather up such scattered memories as they may have left behind them and, above all, such facts as show that Goidelic was spoken on the Continent outside the places of its origin.

____________________
1
In IX, 1912, pp. 1-59; cf. J. Vendryès, in CXL, 1912, pp. 384 ff.

-231-

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