Marked Men: White Masculinity in Crisis

By Sally Robinson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I owe a special debt of gratitude to the undergraduate students at the University of Michigan, who took my courses on American masculinity and became willing collaborators in this project. The excitement that these students brought to the enterprise of interrogating dominant masculinity fueled my own engagement with the project, and this is a better book than it would have been without these students' willingness to challenge their assumptions and my own. For their intellectual generosity and their feminist acumen, I thank Anne Herrmann, Patsy Yaeger, and Valerie Traub-all of whom helped me to see how work on masculinity fits into feminist scholarship. For much-needed encouragement in the later stages, I thank Tobin Siebers and the writing group he organized in Ann Arbor. Rei Terada read key parts of the manuscript at a critical point, and her astute comments helped my argument crystallize into its final form. Sandra Gunning read and reread much of the manuscript, often on short notice and always carefully, and brought me tales of what was happening at the movies when I couldn't go myself. I thank Marlon Ross not only for his reading, his ideas, and his conversation, but for telling me that he found himself laughing out loud at certain points in the manuscript-a comment that buoyed me at a moment when I was having a bit of a crisis over what audiences this book might be appealing to, and what audiences it risked alienating. For their help and support during a difficult time, I thank Suzanne Raitt, Sid Smith, and Rafia Zafar. To certain members of the Michigan English Department, thank you for convincing me I was really onto something and reinforcing my desire to see these ideas in print.

Ann Miller, my editor at Columbia University Press, has been a delight to work with on every level. Peter Lehman, who twice read the manuscript for Columbia, was enthusiastic, encouraging, and incredibly generous. Other, anonymous, readers also helped me to tighten up the argument. Thanks, also,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marked Men: White Masculinity in Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 271

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.