The Transfer of the Sudeten Germans: A Study of Czech-German Relations, 1933-1962

By Radomír Luža | Go to book overview

Prologue

The date was Nov. 19, 1937.

By that date the Sudeten German Party, which at the elections of May 19, 1935, had won more than 60 percent of the German vote,1. was confident of future progress, but its leaders felt an urgent need for a thoroughgoing discussion of their policy with the highest authorities of the Reich. The time had finally arrived, they thought, to solve the Sudeten German question, which had now become a vital political issue. They had been in contact with competent German authorities in the Reich, and had been receiving financial assistance on a regular basis, but now the whole outlook changed. Amid the present quiet reigning in Czechoslovakia, the leaders of the Sudeten German Party secretly proposed to Hitler that their mutual policies be reviewed. Their sense of grievance against and hatred for the Czechs had reached a combustion point, and they looked forward to the moment, for which they had been working so hard, when they might destroy the Czechoslovak Republic. The party, supported by a large majority of its countrymen, was determined to make the necessary national effort against its enemies at home. Its success presupposed that all Sudeten Germans would be grouped around the man who had rebuilt national unity, the leader of the German Reich, Adolf Hitler. The party called for his assistance.

On Nov. 19, 1937, Henlein submitted a secret report to the Führer

____________________
1.
The Sudeten German Party (SdP), led by Konrad Henlein, gained 1,200,000 votes and 44 deputies at the 1935 elections.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Transfer of the Sudeten Germans: A Study of Czech-German Relations, 1933-1962
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.