Proceedings of CSCL '99

By International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning | Go to book overview

CSCL 99 Doctoral Consortium

December 11-12th, 1999


Consortium Faculty
Sherry Hsi, UC Berkeley, Co-Chairsherry @concord.org
Janet Kolodner, Georgia Tech, Co-Chairjlk@cc.gatech.edu
John Bransford, Vanderbilt Universityjohn.bransford@vanderbilt.edu
Barry Fishman, University of Michiganfishman@umich.edu
Timothy Koshmann, Southern Illinois Universitytkoschmann@siumed.edu
Mark Schlager, SRI Internationalschlager@unix.sri.com

Student Abstracts

Desired States: Towards a Model of Team-based Visual Design

Janet Blatter

McGill University, Faculty of Education

Jblatt@po-box.mcgill.ca

My research purpose is twofold: 1) to provide a richer understanding of cooperative visual mediated design; 2) to develop and validate a cognitive model of design activity. In considering the knowledge needed to design in real-world, team settings, I investigate visual communication, how designers think and talk with their diagrams, drawings, sketches, etc.

Design may be considered as a prototypically knowledge-rich, information-poor problem requiring complex and multiple representations and processes in order to produce an object of value. The question of modeling cooperative design knowledge becomes one of articulating how designers coordinate natural and visual languages in order to facilitate negotiation and design production. I adopt an activity theory framework in which knowledge is seen as being mediated by social practices and technologies. I also view cognition as situated and distributed.

I propose looking at the knowledge needed by designers by focusing on the discourse units which emerge from their integrated verbal and visual activity. Using a qualitative, ethnomethodological approach as practiced in cognitive anthropology, I intend to provide a cognitive analysis of visual design based on adapting a design model ( Goel, 1995) to the multimodal discourse - image and verbal - of designers.


Kids and Elders Working Together in an Online Community of History

Jason B. Ellis

Georgia Institute of Technology

jellis@cc.gatech.edu

-7-

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