Proceedings of CSCL '99

By International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning | Go to book overview

Future Work

As the science projects begin to culminate, so do the mentoring relationships. Students are finishing their work, and teachers are advising them to send e-mail to their mentors thanking them for their assistance during the past several months. As most interactions are still ongoing, summative conclusions about the outcomes of the project are tentative. Future analyses will include quantification of the various mentoring interactions (e.g., e-mail, chat discussions, annotation of course work, and face-to-face meetings) as well as conducting interviews and surveys to ascertain the perceptions of the mentors, students, and teachers involved in the project. It is anticipated that this information will guide the implementation of the mentoring program next year, serving as a "needs-analysis" that may point toward better training of mentors and students in use of the technology, expectations for the relationship, and role-clarification for all involved.

Although computer technology has played a major role in the relationships examined during the 1998-99 school year, the face-to-face contact remains critical. Face-to-face meetings provide an array of physical and social resources to aid in the coordination of group work. Visual and verbal presentations, taken together, allow dimensions of clarity that written presentation does not afford ( Olson et al., 1993). One of the challenges faced by computer-mediated communication is how to make distributed interactions as effective as face-to-face interactions ( Ellis et al., 1991). Since most mentors were unable to use videoconferencing throughout this project, it will be interesting to observe the effect videoconferencing has on the student-mentor relationship in future projects. We believe that videoconferencing can provide some of the resources of face-to-face communication. Further exploration of how to integrate and supplement face-to- face communication will be a central theme during the coming school year.

All participants involved in the mentoring relationships recognized the potential value of working together. The technological tools used in this project, while reducing the constraints of physical proximity, also created second-level interpersonal implications that will need to be considered more fully in the future ( Sproull and Kiesler, 1991). Thus, a major challenge in coming years will be determining how to best utilize a mixture of computer-supported technology and traditional mentoring methods to achieve the greatest return for all participants.


Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully acknowledge the cooperation and participation of the students, teachers, and mentors involved in the LiNC project. Special thanks are also extended to Philip Isenhour and others who have masterminded the technology used in the project, and to Dan Dunlap and Jim Helms who assisted in generating and coding the descriptive statistics reported here. The LiNC project is supported by Virginia Tech and the National Science Foundation's Networked Infrastructure for Education (NIE) program, under award REC-9554206.


Bibliography

Carroll, J. M., & Neale, D. C. ( 1998). Community mentoring relationships in middle school science. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the Third International conference on the Learning Sciences (ICLS-98), Atlanta, GA.

Carroll, J. M. & Rosson, M. B. ( 1996). "Developing the Blacksburg electronic village". Communications of the ACM, 39( 12), 69-74.

Ellis, C. A., Gibbs, S. J., & Rein, G. L. ( 1991). "Groupware: Some issues and experiences". Communicaitons of the ACM, 34( 1), 38-58.

Gaskill, L. R. ( 1993). "A conceptual framework for the development, implementation, and evaluation of formal mentoring programs". Journal of Career Development, 20( 2), 147-160.

Glasgow, N. A. ( 1996). Taking the classroom into the community: A guidebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

HP Telementor Program. ( 1999). The international telementor center. http://www.telementor.org/

Koenemann, J., Carroll, J. M., Shaffer, C. A., Rosson, M. B., & Abrams, M. ( 1998). Designing collaborative applications for classroom use: The LiNC project. In A. Druin, (Ed.), The designing of children's technology. San Francisco: Morgan-Kaufmann, pages 99-123.

Lawrie, J. ( 1987). "How to develop a formal mentoring program". Training and Development, 41, 25-27.

Mann, R. W. & Staudenmier, J. M. ( 1991). "Strategic shifts in executive development". Training and Development, 45, 37-40.

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Proceedings of CSCL '99
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 688

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.