Proceedings of CSCL '99

By International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning | Go to book overview

Enhancing human communication by technology is likely to be a powerful tool for improving schools. It suggests that a larger goal for technology use and school reform should be an explicit focus on community building. This leads to questions such as: Can the use of distance learning labs and other types of video interaction -- such as NetMeeting, extended discussions from chat sessions and electronic teacher's lounge, and other opportunities for communication (e.g., Bly, et al., 1993) -- extend and support the explicit growth and teacher reflection on practice? Will this be susctained after project support ends? Does broader participation of teachers in learning communities lead to more interest in setting up learning communities for students? How might this expanded community impact students, their learning, and their valuing the idea of community?

With growing comfort with technology, supported by human and electronic connections, teachers in the MELC project have shown themselves to be eager to learn more, create more, and share more. We plan to continue to monitor the ways this community evolves and the impact it has on teaching and technology use in the classroom.


Acknowledgments

We thank the Baltimore City Public Schools and the wonderful teachers who are members of the Maryland Electronic Learning Community. We also thank our colleagues at the University of Maryland and partners who are involved in other parts of this effort. A U.S. Department of Education Technology Challenge Grant (#R303A50051) to the Baltimore City Public Schools has supported this work.


Bibliography

Bly, S. A., Harrison, S. R., and Irwin, S. "Media spaces: bringing people together in a video, audio, and computing environment". Communications of the ACM, Vol. 36, No. 1 ( Jan. 1993), Pages 28-46

Darling-Hammond, L., & M. W. McLaughlin. ( 1995). "Policies that support professional development in an era of reform." Phi Delta Kappan 76, 8: 597-604.

Darling-Hammond, L. ( 1999). Teacher learning that supports student learning, Edutopia, http://www.glef.org/edutopia/newsletters/6.2/darling.html

Kraut, R. E., & Egido, C. ( 1988). Patterns of contact and communication in scientific research collaboration. Proceedings of the Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, New York: ACM, page 1-12.

Lave J. & Wegner, E. ( 1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Marchinoni, G., Nolet, V., Williams, H., Ding, W., Beale, J., Rose, A., Gordon, A., Enmoto, E., & Harbinson, L. ( 1997). Content + connectivity = community: Digital resources for a learning community. In ACM Digital Libraries, pp. 212-220.

Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress. ( 1995). Teachers and technology: Making the connection. OTA- EHR-616. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. www.wws.princeton.edu/∼ota/ns20/year_f.html/index.html or www.ota.nap.edu/pdf/data/1995/9541.pdf.

Office of Technology Assessment, U.S. Congress. ( 1989). Linking for Learning: Technologies for Learning at a Distance. OTA-SET- Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. www.wws.princeton.edu/∼ota/ns20/year_f.html/index.html or www.ota.nap.edu/pdf/1989/8921.pdf.

Pea, R. D. & Gomez, L. M. ( 1992). "Distributed multimedia learning environments: Why and How?" Interactive Learning Environments, 2( 2), 73-109.

Reil, M., & Fulton, K. ( 1998). Technology in the classroom: Tools for doing things differently or doing different things. Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, Phi Delta Kappan (submitted).

Rose, A., Ding, W., Marchionini, G., Beale, J., & Nolet, V. ( 1998). Building an electronic learning community: From design to implementation. In ACM SIGCHI, pp. 203-210.

Ruopp, R, Gal, S. Drayton, B, & Pfister, M. ( 1993). LabNet: Toward a community of practice. Hillsdale, N J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Sandholtz, J. H., Ringstaff, C., & Dwyer, D. C. ( 1997). Teaching with technology: Creating student-centered classrooms. New York: Teachers College Press.

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